Bianchi-Ursus - Miniature racing cyclists

BCU

New product

Our miniature racing cyclists

Handpainted miniature cyclist with Bianch-Ursusi jersey.

-Completely produced out of metal: bike + cyclist
-Dimensions: height 50mm x width 50mm
-Weight: 23 grams

More details

3 Items

9,90 €

Data sheet

TypeK
PostureStandard
GenderMale
ColourMulti color
Periode1941-1950
MaterialZamac
Height50mm
Width50mm
Depth16mm
Weight23g
PaintedCyclist

More info

Fausto Coppi

Fausto Coppi was an Italian cyclist. Nicknamed Campionissimo (Champion of champions) and l'Airone (the Heron) was one of the most famous and successful riders of his generation. He is one of the best and most popular Italian riders of all time. Coppi was a complete rider, for all kinds of road races. He rode in the seasons 1949 and 1950 for Bianchi-Ursus.

As a pro from 1939 to 1959 he won both in the main stage races and also in the one-day classics. He won five times the Giro d'Italia (1940, 1947, 1949, 1952 and 1953), a record he shared with Binda and Merckx, and twice the Tour de France (1949 and 1952), and also became the first rider to win the two races in the same year. Among his numerous successes in the classic races, we has five victories in the Giro di Lombardia (1946, 1947, 1948, 1949 and 1954), three victories in Milan-Sanremo (1946, 1948 and 1949) and Paris-Roubaix in 1950. In 1953 he became world road champion. He also excelled in track cycling: he was world champion chase in 1947 and 1949 and time record holder (with 45,798 km) from 1942 to 1956.

His rivalry with Gino Bartali, who divided Italy in the post-war period (also because of the allegedly different political positions of the two) was legendary.

Coppi is also known to have changed the approach to cycling races, thanks to his interest in nutrition, technical developments of the bicycle, training methods and sports medicine.

His exploits and the tragic circumstances of his death have made him an icon of Italian sports history. Decades after his death, he has not lost any of his popularity and fame. In 1959 Coppi got malaria in Burkina-Faso, the former Upper Volta. There he took part in a cycling race. Once back in Italy, the doctors did not notice the disease. He was given medication against pneumonia. Instead of helping, the medication worsed his illness. Coppi died in 1960. He was only 40 years old.

His most important victories:
1940 general classification Tour of Italy
1942 Italian championship on the road
1942 World hour record in Milan (45,871 km/h)
1946 Milan-San Remo
1946 Tour of Lombardy
1946 Grand Prix des Nations
1947 Italian cycling championship
1947 general classification Tour of Italy
1947 Tour of Lombardy
1947 Grand Prix of the Nations
1948 Milan-San Remo
1948 Tour of Lombardy
1948 Mountains classification Tour of Italy
1949 World Championship pursuit on the track in Copenhagen
1949 Italian championship on the road
1949 general classification Tour of France
1949 Mountain classification Tour of France
1949 general classification Tour of Italy
1949 Mountains classification Tour of Italy
1949 Milan-San Remo
1949 Tour of Lombardy
1950 Paris-Roubaix
1950 Walloon Arrow
1952 general classification Tour of France
1952 Mountains classification Tour of France
1952 general classification Tour of Italy
1953 World Road Cycling Championships in Lugano
1953 general classification Tour of Italy
1954 Tour of Lombardy
1955 Italian championship on the road

Discover our other miniature cyclists as wel.

Accessories

Customers who bought this product also bought: